Tuesdays 7-9pm.

Enter the heart of the Tibetan Buddhist tradition.

Study the philosophy and practice of Madhyamaka, or the “Middle Way” as presented by the renowned Indian Buddhist philosopher Nagarjuna and his Indian and Tibetan commentators. Explore the unique presentation of reality as taught by the Nalanda masters. *Prerequisites required to attend; please contact the office for details.*

Course Description

An overview and in-depth introduction to the heart of the Tibetan Buddhist tradition, the philosophy and practice of Madhyamaka, or the “Middle Way” as presented by the renowned Indian Buddhist philosopher Nagarjuna and his Indian and Tibetan commentators. Primary readings for this course include Lama Tsongkhapa’s Essence of Eloquence (Lekshe Nyingpo) and its sources. Students are strongly encouraged to enroll in MDT303 Techniques of Meditation: Madhyamaka in conjunction with this class.

PHL303: Madhyamaka Philosophy: Where Is the Middle Way?
Faculty: Yangsi Rinpoche
2 Credit

Yangsi Rinpoche

Yangsi Rinpoche, Geshe Lharampa, is founder and president of Maitripa College. Rinpoche was recognized as the reincarnation of Geshe Ngawang Gendun, a renowned scholar and practitioner from Western Tibet, at the age of six. He trained in the traditional monastic system for over 25 years, and practiced as a monk until the age of 35 and is the author of Practicing the Path: A Commentary on the Lamrim Chenmo, published in 2003 by Wisdom Publications. >Read More

William (Bill) Magee, PhD

William (Bill) Magee, PhD, taught Introduction to Literary Tibetan at the University of Virginia for thirteen years. From 2003 until 2011 he taught Tibetan religious traditions at Dharma Drum Buddhist College in Taiwan and retired to become Vice President of Jeffrey Hopkins’ UMA Institute for Tibetan Studies.

Co-author with Elizabeth Napper of Fluent Tibetan: A Proficiency-Oriented Learning System for Novice and Intermediate Tibetan, he has published several books about Indian and Tibetan philosophical thought as well as a novel about a fictitious Tibet of the future. >more