MAITRIPA COLLEGE: SPRING 2012 COURSES


ACADEMIC PROGRAM LINKS

ACADEMIC CALENDAR

FALL 2013

September 2: Fall 2013 semester begins

September 16: Last day to add/drop classes for Fall 2013 semester

November 24-December 1: Thanksgiving week

December 2: Registration opens for Spring 2014 semester

December 21: Fall 2013 semester ends

SPRING 2014

February 3: Spring 2014 semester begins; registration opens for Summer 2014 semester

March 1: Early Admissions Deadline for application for Fall 2014 semester

February 17: Last day to add/drop classes for Spring 2014 semester

March 31-April 11: Spring break

May 1: Priority Deadline for application for Fall 2014 semester

May 20: Registration opens for Fall 2014 semester

June 6: Spring semester ends

SUMMER 2014

June 16 – August 14: Summer Session

FALL 2014

September 1: Fall 2014 semester begins

September 15: Last day to add/drop classes for Fall 2014 semester

November 24-30: Thanksgiving week

December 8: Registration opens for Spring 2015 semester

December 19: Fall 2014 semester ends


>return to top

Maitripa College is a nonprofit corporation authorized by the State of Oregon to offer and confer the academic degrees described herein, following a determination that state academic standards will be satisfied under OAR 583-030. Inquiries concerning the standards or school compliance may be directed to the Office of Degree Authorization, 1500 Valley River Drive, Suite 100, Eugene, Oregon, 97401.


Spring 2012 COURSE LIST (On-Campus Courses)
*click here for complete course description (below) and here for the complete course catalog
*click here for Faculty bios

*click here to REGISTER NOW

CRN

COURSE

CREDITS

DAY/TIME

INSTRUCTOR

PHL302

Foundations of Buddhist Thought: The Medium
& Great Scope

2

Tuesdays
7-9 pm

Yangsi Rinpoche

MDT302

Techniques of Buddhist Meditation: The Medium
& Great Scope

2

Fridays
11am -1 pm

Yangsi Rinpoche

PHL304

Madhyamaka Philosophy:
A Dose of Emptiness

2

Wednesdays
7-9 pm

Yangsi Rinpoche

MDT304

Madhyamaka Meditation: Preparation for Vajrayana

2

Tuesdays
4:30-6:30 pm

Yangsi Rinpoche

TIB102

Classical Tibetan Language II

3

Tuesday & Thursdays
1-2:30 pm
Jim Blumenthal

TIB202

Intermediate Tibetan II:
Bridge to Translation

2

Thursdays
5-7 pm

Yangsi Rinpoche

CST002

Compassionate Service:
Building Bridges

3
Fridays 9:00-10:30 am
Steven Vannoy & Guest Lecturers
CS002

Compassionate Service:
Building Bridges

1
Fridays 9:00-10:30 am (First 7 Weeks Only)
Steven Vannoy & Guest Lecturers
CST004
Buddhist Ministry & Leadership: Building Spiritual Communities
3
Friday
12:00-1:30 pm
Steven Vannoy & Guest Lecturers
CS004

A Life of Social Action

1

Friday
12:00-1:30 pm
(First 7 Weeks Only)
Steven Vannoy & Guest Lecturers
PHL450
Theories & Methods of
Buddhist Studies
2
Mondays
7-9 pm
Jim Blumenthal
PHL321

The Good Heart: Buddhist Literature & Meditation - Cultivating Compassion through Lojong

2
Fridays
3:00-5:00pm
Yangsi Rinpoche & Dr. Steven Vannoy
PHL500
Masters Thesis/
Comprehensive Exam
4
TBA
TBA
THL500
Master of Divinity Final Project – Practical Theology (4 credits).
4
TBA
TBA


SPRING 2012 DISTANCE LEARNING (ONLINE) COURSE LIST (online course are not for credit)
**click here for complete course description (below) and here for the complete course catalog
***click here to REGISTER NOW

CRN

COURSE

INSTRUCTOR

PHL302d

Foundations of Buddhist Thought: The Medium and Great Scope

Yangsi Rinpoche

MDT302d

Techniques of Buddhist Meditation: The Medium & Great Scope

Yangsi Rinpoche

PHL304d

Madhyamaka Philosophy: A Dose of Emptiness

Yangsi Rinpoche

MDT304d

Madhyamaka Meditation: Preparation for Vajrayana

Yangsi Rinpoche

PHL321
The Good Heart: Buddhist Literature & Meditation - Cultivating Compassion through Lojong
Yangsi Rinpoche
& Dr. Steven Vannoy

MAITRIPA COLLEGE SPRING 2012 COURSE OFFERINGS

CS002. Compassionate Service: Building Bridges (1 credit, 2nd Term MA)
Building on the foundation of CS001, this course will focus on developing the students' practical understanding, fluency, and perspective on issues of Buddhist social service, with a focus on framing community issues in terms of spiritual practice, and caring for spiritual communities. As with all service learning curriculums at Maitripa, the course will emphasize the laboratory of the service partner environment and one's own mind as the foreground for understanding, integration, and transformation. This class includes a 20-hour concurrent service-learning project.

CST002. Compassionate Service: Building Bridges (3 credits, 2nd Term MDiv)
Building on the foundation of CST001, this course will focus on developing the students' practical understanding, fluency, and perspective on issues of Buddhist social service, with a focus on framing community issues in terms of spiritual practice, caring for spiritual communities, Interfaith relationships, and models of community care. As with all service learning curriculums at Maitripa, the course will emphasize the laboratory of the service partner environment and one's own mind as the foreground for understanding, integration, and transformation. As this is a core class for MDiv program students, another level of emphasis and exploration will also be placed on development of leadership skills and methods inside and outside one's own community. This class includes a 30-hour concurrent service-learning project.

CS004. A Life of Social Action (1 credit, 3rd Term MA)
This course will focus on facilitating the fourth term student in their service experience and helping them shape their accumulated body service of work into their culminating work for the term, a final project. This will be accomplished through an advanced study of personal narrative and an immersion in a group reflective process based on their service experience thus far. The focus and direction of the primary course materials and reading lists for the term will be developed by each student in accordance with his or her needs in conjunction with the course instructor.

CST004. Buddhist Ministry & Leadership: Building Spiritual Communities (3 credits, 3rd Term MDiv)
This course is intended for the intermediate/advanced student seeking a practical context for their spiritual training. The course will explore modern concepts of spiritual community and leadership and consider how a Buddhist community might evolve and integrate itself with purpose and dignity into the fabric of modern society. Topics covered will include leadership theory, as well as an introduction to organizational development, Dharma centers & communities, becoming an instructor, fundraising, the clash of cultures east & west, and more.

MDT302 | MDT302d. Techniques of Buddhist Meditation: The Medium & Great Scope (2 credits)
This course will continue with instruction in meditation based on the foundations established in MDT 301. The course will be taught in an interactive format, allowing students the opportunity to learn specific meditations as directed by the instructor, practice them, and discuss their experiences in class. The subject matter will parallel the topics of Buddhist philosophy as taught in as taught in PHL302 | PHL302d. Part of this class will include regular meditation sessions out of class, the keeping of a sitting journal, and the opportunity for objective discussion on the effect of these practices on the individual’s mind. If desired, the committed student will have the opportunity to work with the instructor to design a personal meditation practice.

MDT304 | MDT304d. Madhyamaka Meditation: Preparation for Vajrayana (2 credits)
The subject matter of this course will parallel the topics of Buddhist philosophy as taught in as taught in PHL304 | PHL304d. The course will be taught in an interactive format, allowing students the opportunity to learn specific meditations as directed by the instructor, practice them, and discuss their experiences in class. Part of this class will include regular meditation sessions out of class, the keeping of a sitting journal, and the opportunity for objective discussion on the effect of these practices on the individual’s mind. If desired, the committed student will have the opportunity to work with the instructor to design a personal meditation practice.

PHL302 | PHL302d.  Foundations of Buddhist Thought: The Medium and Great Scope (2 credits)
This class surveys the foundational philosophical ideas of the Buddhist tradition as presented by the great pandits of India and commented upon by the Tibetan inheritors of the Indian Buddhist tradition. The course will make use of philosophical treatises (primary sources in translation), literature, and historical analysis to present the foundations of Buddhist philosophy. Readings will include selections from Vasubandhu’s Abhidharmakosha,  Dharmakirti’s Pramanavarttika, the Abhisamayalamkara (attributed to Maitreya), Guide to the Bodhisattva's Way of Life, and 70 Topics, as well as modern scholarly analysis of the same. There will be a particular focus on the readings as they relate to the medium and great scope of the Lamrim as presented by the Tibetan scholar Je Tsongkhapa and others. Students will gain a strong foundation in Buddhist philosophy including key topics that relate to the medium and great scopes such as: cause and effect, the potential for enlightenment, the structure of existence according to the Buddhist world view. Students will gain a strong foundation in Buddhist philosophy including key topics that relate to the great scope such as: loving kindness, great compassion, and abandoning the mind of self-cherishing, as well as topics that relate to the great scope such as the mind of enlightenment, the six perfections, and an in-depth examination of the path of a bodhisattva.

PHL304 | PHL304d. Madhyamaka Philosophy: A Dose of Emptiness (2 credits)
A continuation of Madhyamaka I class, in which the exploration and debate of the philosophy and practice of Madhyamaka, or the “ Middle Way ” is deepened and refined. The primary reading text for this class will be Khedrup Je’s Dose of Emptiness (stong thun chen mo), a detailed critical exposition of the theory and practice of emptiness as expounded in the three major schools of Mahayana philosophy, as well as its commentaries. Students are strongly encouraged to enroll in MDT306 Madhyamaka Meditation: Preparation for Vajrayana in conjunction with this class.

PHL321/PHL321d: THE GOOD HEART: Buddhist Literature & Meditation – Cultivating Compassion through Lojong (2 credits)
This course will examine a corpus of Buddhist teachings called lojong (mind training) from both a traditional Tibetan Buddhist and a Western psychological approach. Based on the essential Mahayana Buddhist teachings of impermanence, compassion, and the exchange of self and other, the lojong teachings are a source of guidance shared by masters of all Tibetan traditions. These teachings offer techniques and inspiration toward a deep altruism for others, which in turn trains the practitioner’s mind toward the embrace of tranquility and joy under any conditions. Western social psychology specializes in the observation and description of us as social beings, illuminating the best and worst of human behavior. This class will explore theories for why love, affection, and altruism are important for human development from the perspective of western psychology and the interstices between these conclusions and the Buddhist presentation of compassion. A combination of philosophical study, discussion, reflection, and meditation training will be utilized in the exploration of these topics. Texts studied will include: Serlingpa’s Leveling Out All Conceptions, Atisa’s Bodhisattva’s Jewel Garland, Langri Tangpa’s Eight Verses on Mind Training, Chekawa’s Seven-Point Mind Training, among other Buddhist texts and works of Western psychology.

PHL450. Theories & Methods of Buddhist Studies (2 credits)
This course is designed to give students the methodological and theoretical tools needed to think critically about ways to approach the academic study of Buddhism, tools that will be imperative in the preparation of their thesis. What are the goals of Buddhist Studies?  What are the best methods for achieving those goals? What sorts of presuppositions and assumptions do we bring into our work and our orientation towards Buddhism? Do our presuppositions and assumptions serve our goals? How do political, religious, and/or ideological preferences impact our engagement with the object of study? What are the authoritative sources for the information we want and how do we determine that? How do we understand and interpret the “data”? What sorts of responsibilities do scholars have? What we study and how we study it are inextricably tied to questions of theory and method. Those who see methodological discussions as needless academic meanderings do not somehow thereby free themselves of methodological biases. Everybody engages their object of study with a theoretical and methodological orientation. The goal of this class is to encourage students to do so consciously, to think about their own assumptions and the assumptions of the broader community of scholars who engage the Buddhist traditions.

PHL500. Master’s Thesis/Comprehensive Exam (4 credits)
Final mastery for the MA degree is demonstrated through one of the following two options: 1. Passing a Final, Comprehensive Exam - The comprehensive exam is an on-campus four-hour exam covering the breadth of content of the subject matter of the MA degree. A list of 50 potential questions from which the faculty will draw are given to the students in advance for their study and preparation. The actual exam will have twelve questions from which the student will choose eight to answer in separate essays. Students will be given the list of questions at the start of the term in which they plan to take the exam, and the PHL500 class will meet during the term for review sessions. 2. Completion of a Master's Thesis - Under special circumstances, the highly motivated and extremely committed student may petition the Maitripa College MA faculty to complete a thesis project. Thesis projects must be completed within 2 semesters (1 year) of all other coursework and degree requirements at Maitripa. The student must enroll in PHL500 for each term they are working on the thesis until it is complete. For further details please see the Dean of Education or Director of Programs.

TIB102. Classical Tibetan Language II (3 credits)
Continuation of introduction to alphabet, grammar, and sentence structure of classical Tibetan language.

TIB202. Classical Tibetan Language Intermediate II (2 credits)
Students continue to deepen their knowledge of Tibetan grammar and syntax through reading and decoding more complex texts, treatises, poetry, and commentaries on Buddhist philosophy and practice in their original language. This course includes the continued study of translation theory, and students will begin working on their own basic translations. Students receive oral commentary of the texts they are working with as part of the class and as an aid to their understanding and translation of the texts.


THL500. Master of Divinity Final Project - Practical Theology (4 credits)
The Master of Divinity program culminates in the completion of a substantial final written project that embodies the integration of the student's practical and theoretical knowledge and understanding gained in the program. The PTP class will meet throughout the term with the designated PTP advisor to help guide the students through the process of constructing their paper. PTP classes meet in Spring term only.


LOCATION | CONTACTS | VISIT

Maitripa College | 1119 SE Market Street | Portland, Oregon USA 97214 | phone: 503-235-2477 | email: info@maitripa.org | fax: 503-231-6408